Specializations

Occasional Pain? Look Within…

I don’t know anyone that doesn’t run their life right up to the edge. Even when we go on “vacation” we fill up the time with sight-seeing and entertainment, rather than sitting still and getting back in touch with ourselves.

When we finally push ourselves over the edge, we get sick – perhaps a migraine, often a cold or flu, not infrequently a muscle strain, and most seriously cancer or joint degeneration.

The point is that it’s not the all-nighter or the move or the argument that brings on the specific illness or injury. The problem reflects the burdens of everyday living that we carry in that part of the body. That move or job change just pushed it over the edge.

So if you have occasional pain that your doctor can’t diagnose, the next place to point the finger is at your lifestyle and attitudes. The pain is a signal from your subconscious that something is out of whack. If the point isn’t clear, through hypnotherapy I can help you encourage the subconscious to be more specific, and then build effective responses to the challenges it’s been trying to manage.

Call me at 805-775-6716 – and Bring Your Whole Self to Life.

Relationships

Birth to Breakup

Psychoanalysis presupposes that we can reason about our behavior, but our brain adapts to the conditions of infancy long before we can reason. Most importantly, it is in infancy that we decide whether to trust that the world will care for us. In refining his therapeutic methods, John Kappas recognized this split in his clients, a split between “emotional” and “physical.” For clarity, this presentation adopts the terms “protector” and “adventurer.”

As shared within, protectors and adventurers need each other, but also drive each other crazy.

The focus of the presentation is on professional relationships. Complementarity between protectors and adventurers also defines our intimate relationships. There’s much more to be said there – Kappas was a licensed therapist, and shared his views in the book “Relationship Success: The E&P Attraction.”

Book Reviews

Ericksonian Elicitation: A Book Review

Milton Erickson was a titan of psychological research. He’s also a personal hero. His most important paper on trance makes the firm statement that the therapist’s highest priority is to protect the integrity of the subject’s personality. For me, this commitment has been central to the development of clinical rapport. We can analyze technique and method, but I read Erickson’s papers and understand that his intuition was guided by people that wanted to reveal themselves to him. His phrasing of suggestions reflects the tenderness with which he confirmed their invitation.

Erickson’s impact upon his students was profound. One of them – Jeffrey Zeig – peppers “The Induction of Hypnosis: An Ericksonian Elicitation Approach” with personal vignettes. The instruction that follows makes evident his devotion to Erickson’s memory. A whole chapter celebrates his impact on the history of psychology following World War II.

For the professional, the development is a little slow. In part this follows from ambiguity in the definition of hypnosis. For the first six chapters, Zeig offers metaphors and stories in building a procedural definition rooted in the experience of the subject. The subject experiences, in order:

  1. Modified awareness – even something as simple as becoming aware of their breathing.
  2. Altered intensity – noticing the correlations between focused attention and experience.
  3. Avolitional experience – being guided into awareness without conscious ratification.
  4. Avolitional response – responding to experience without conscious ratification.
  5. Ratification of hypnosis – the operator bringing these elements into awareness and labelling them as “hypnosis” or “trance.”

The goal is for the subject to become receptive to suggestions from the operator. This requires agency on both sides: the subject trusts, and the operator builds rapport. On the operator’s side, Ericksonian phrasing makes the transition extremely comfortable. The pattern is pace, lead, and motivate. In pacing, the operator offers truisms – observations that are natural to the situation. Having attained that agreement, the subject is then led into the next step of the elicitation. Finally, they are offered a statement that aligns the step with their motivations. When the step is taken, it seems not only natural but as though it always was that way.

Zeig guides the reader through the grammar of Ericksonian elicitation. This is a finicky subject, and while clearly described, actual use of the grammar requires extended practice. This is emphasized: Zeig cautions that the operator should not be thinking “This would be a good place for a presupposition. Oh, and then I can offer an embedded command!” Instead, the operator is tracking the subject’s descent into hypnosis, and intuitively offers statements that serve the elicitation. To facilitate the development of that intuition, Zeig analyzes transcripts for study – all involving students that offer intelligent analysis of their experience. That is no substitute for immediate practice.

As a professional, I found myself wanting more at the end of the book. Zeig does a detailed deconstruction of a “traditional” model of hypnosis that I would characterize as a “straw man.” Zeig focuses on scripts. While the structure of a session does follow the pattern Zeig lays out, non-Ericksonian therapy does not require scripts – and even when I reference a script I rarely follow it slavishly.

Having demolished his straw man, Zeig promotes a core virtue of Ericksonian therapy: a session begins with elicitation. Unfortunately, the shift to therapy takes us out of the pattern of elicitation, into (progressively) 1) confusion and destabilization, 2) perceptual alteration, and 3) disassociation. The goal is to identify the mechanisms held in the subject’s mind that allow behaviors to be adapted. Sensory metaphors figure prominently, each wrapping a suggestion to create, modify, or delete an experience or behavior. Once disassociation is attained, those mechanisms can then be used to alter behaviors independently of the rest of the mind.

Zeig allows that to survey the subject’s inventory of adaptive mechanisms involves several sessions before therapy can proceed. Unfortunately, that procedure is not developed in depth, leaving the professional to wonder what to do after hypnosis is elicited.

The focus on disassociation is also troubling. Disassociation allows the subconscious to control movement and sensation without conscious awareness. In his writings, Erickson was proud of automatic writing and waking hallucinations. But ultimately the subject must integrate their experience and learnings. That may be accomplished by reinforcement as the subject is brought back into the normal state. Erickson never addressed this point, and neither does Zeig. What Erickson reported was, in fact, that by use of these disassociation he could create long-term syndromes in colleagues .

At the conclusion, Zeig’s writing left me a little flat. In attacking the methods that I use every day, Zeig showed a lack of respect for the work that has been done in the “traditional” model to assimilate Erickson’s central tenet: protecting the integrity of the subject’s personality. That includes:

  • offering the subject’s conscious mind a simple explanation of the therapeutic process,
  • the origination of free-style imagery in which the subject has autonomous engagement with their subconscious as the unified mind seeks for healing, and
  • allowing that the subject may evolve new behavioral development strategies.

More daunting, however, is Zeig’s observation that Erickson seemed to make it up as he went along – and that his most impressive elicitations involved unspoken elements. Erickson may not have been a therapist in the normal sense – he may have been a guru.  Zeig steers safely clear of those waters.

Basics

Is Hypnotherapy Expensive?

Most hypnotherapists will charge anywhere from $75/hr to $250/hr. The rate depends upon experience, talent and locale.

Prospective clients may be surprised at these numbers, often because they are used to insurance co-pays for mental health services. Hypnotherapy is not covered by most insurance plans because we don’t often deal with mental illness. We are dealing with optional, quality-of-life concerns – things that can be avoided by taking a different route to the store or seeking a different job. They are also far more common than mental illness, which is why they are excluded from insurance coverage.

Unfortunately, those optional concerns can become the seed from which true mental illness is born. Remember when the uninsured would wait until they were sick enough to get admitted to the emergency room? It’s something like that. Sometimes literally so: failure to deal with cigarette, alcohol or drug addiction can lead to serious long-term medical consequences. In the arena of mental health, failure to deal with a phobia can build until the client can’t leave their home. The quality-of-life issue becomes a mental illness.

But still, if the issue is not yet that severe when we start work with a client, why should hypnotherapists charge rates similar to those charged by doctors and lawyers?

The reason we do is because you are asking us to help you care for your mind. If you don’t value your mind, then the subconscious is going to pick up on that and not buy into doing the work.

Your subconscious is seven times more powerful than your conscious mind. I don’t want to have to fight its lethargy, so I charge enough money to ensure that the subconscious knows that success is important – and as soon as possible.

It’s also enough that every client should take picking their therapist seriously. Interview more than one, and from more than one school of treatment. Here in Ventura, we have graduates of the Hypnosis Motivation Institute, including myself, drawing upon over a thousand hours of training. That training emphasizes the importance of protecting the integrity of the client’s personality and is reflected in the way we interview, customize therapy to the client, and use dreams. Our rates reflect our skills – and our investment in caring.

The least sophisticated practitioners will use one-size-fits-all methods and scripted therapies. Those are effective for many clients, and particularly so if you feel that you have good rapport with the therapist. In between is a spectrum – you’ll almost always be able to find someone that you’re comfortable with.

But if the therapy doesn’t work, don’t let yourself be told that “You can’t be hypnotized.” That’s not true: you just need a more sophisticated practitioner.